Spacious Cabin on Wheels with Large Windows

sweet-tiny-home

Side View

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I love how it has so many windows and the large sliding glass doors.

Side View with Plenty of Covered Porch Space

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If it were up to me I would have put the sliding glass doors to give you direct access to the covered porch. That would make the most sense to me.

Kitchen with Lots of Cabinets

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Bathroom with Full Shower

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Floor Plan

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This model is called the Puget Sound. It was built using cedar lap siding but you can also use log siding too.

There are a bunch of optional features, too, which I’ll list for you in bullet format below:

  • 6′ or 10′ covered front porch
  • Double doors accessing front porch
  • Additional length up to 33′
  • 32″ shower
  • Pine tongue & groove interior
  • Drywall interior

For even more info, specs and pics on this Park Model style tiny house on wheels go here to Rich’s Portable Cabins.

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13 comments

  1. @Alex:

    I agree with you. I see the doors going out to the porch is listed as an optional feature. I think I would have preferred to see the sliding glass doors going out to the porch area standard acting as the default “front doors”.

    I love the house concept though. Beautiful. Love all those big windows.

    1. You would need a special license to tow it so most would have to hire somebody to move it. Wouldn’t be the best choice if you plan to move frequently, but if not, it’s pretty great.

  2. They make these 399 square foot (typical) “Park Model” homes with all kinds of floor plans, most of which would at least have some kind of door to the covered porch. I can see having the sliding door on the side, so there’s a large unobstructed view (rather than looking through the porch area). But I just can’t fathom having NO door at all from the inside to the porch. Crazy!

    1. Alex and others have made the point before that it is downsizing to what is right for the buyer/ builder of a tiny home. We may not know that the buyer comes from 5000sq ft. Food for thought.

  3. The purists seek purity. The practical recognize that not everyone can live comfortably in 100sf. What if half of a couple thinks tiny houses are marvelous, while the other gets claustrophobic with the drapes closed. Should they give up and keep the big house, or find a wise compromise? The “tiny house” movement is one faction of a much larger socio-economic shift toward wiser living. It should be a good example of what CAN be done, so that more folks will be encouraged to try, rather than DIS-couraged by sarcasm.

  4. A Park Model home really works well for someone who is becoming retirement age and doesn’t want to climb stairs or a ladder too sleep.

    1. Hi
      I’m with you all the way. Do not want to climb stairs let alone a ladder! If you come
      from a very large home why not larger? As we get older the idea is comfort.
      Best to all….

  5. I like it very much. You did a good job building it. I would need one like this with the bedroom on main floor, as I can’t climb stairs.

  6. Hi, I am a home health medical professional and there is an enormous need in my area for low cost housing for retired and/or disabled persons, but must be truly handicap accessable. Does anyone know of a small or tiny house that has walkways and interior doorways wide enough for a standard walker? Most of my patients love the idea of a tiny house, less space to maintain, lower heating/cooling costs but not only is climbing a ladder or stairs to a loft bedroom not an option, narrow doorways are a big problem in many current housing options.

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